Russian traditions

Maslenitsa – Slavic holiday of saying goodbye to winter

From 4 to 10 March this year, Russian people celebrate the ancient Slavic holiday symbolizing the farewell of winter and the joyful expectation of spring – Maslenitsa. This holiday is considered an echo of pre-Christian times when the Slavs were still pagans. Before the adoption of Christianity, Maslenitsa was celebrated for 14 days, and after it shortened to a week. The Orthodox church accepted Maslenitsa as one of its holidays – Maslenitsa falls on the week preceding the Great Lent (the dates change every year). Continue reading “Maslenitsa – Slavic holiday of saying goodbye to winter”

Dacha as part of the Russian philosophy of life

The famous Russian word “dacha” (да́ча) has entered many foreign languages but does not have an exact equivalent in any of them. Often the word “dacha” is translated as “countryside cottage”, “summer residence”, or “villa”, but none of these translations fully disclose this phenomenon. Dacha is not only a countryside house but also a particular lifestyle. Intrigued? Then this article is for you! Continue reading “Dacha as part of the Russian philosophy of life”

Visiting a Russian house – Different types of visits you can be invited to

Do you like to pay visits to people? Most Russians would answer this question with a definitive “yes”. And if you ask them “do you like to receive guests?”, they would give the same answer – “yes”. Russian people have always been known for their hospitality, but did you know that there are several types of visits to which you can be invited? Continue reading “Visiting a Russian house – Different types of visits you can be invited to”

Russian superstitions

Russian word for superstition – суеве́рие [su-ye-vyé-ree-ye] – is made of two parts: «суе» which means “vain”, and «вера» which means “belief”. Thus, superstitions in Russian are “vain believes”. Continue reading “Russian superstitions”